Eduqas Computer Science Teaching Resources & Lesson Plans

​Eduqas specification

​GCSE Document Reference

​Additional content

1

​Component 1

Cell
Cell

​Hardware

Cell

​Logical operations

​XOR logical operator

Cell

​Communication

Cell
Cell

​Organization and structure of data

​Records

​File design

​Design algorithms and programming routines that validate and verify data

Cell

​Operating systems

Cell
Cell

​Principles of programming

Cell
Cell

​Software engineering

Cell
Cell

​Program construction

​Stages involved during compilation

Cell

​Security and data management

​Need for generation of files

​Key loggers

​Calculate compression ratios

​Internet cookies

Cell

​Ethical, legal and environmental impacts of digital technology on wider society

Cell

​2

​Component 2

Cell
Cell
Cell

​Problem solving

Cell
Cell

​Algorithms and programming constructs

​XOR logical operator & testing and evaluation

Cell

​Programming languages

​Object oriented languages,
few more tags of HTML & few mnemonics of  assembly language

Cell

​Data structures and data types

​Scope and lifetime of variables

Cell

​Security and authentication

Cell

​Security and authentication

​​With GCSE exams around the corner, soon you’ll be completing your assessments to get your GCSE Computer Science diploma. First of all, well done! Not only have you made it this far but the fact that you’re reading this means that you’re thinking ahead and getting informed. Reading through your syllabus and about exams may well have you feeling overwhelmed. That’s exactly why we’re here to help you get through this seemingly hectic period. We’ve gathered all of the material you need to prepare for your exams and to make the most out of your GCSE Computer Science revision.

It’s crucial to begin preparing for your revision by understanding who has created your syllabus and who writes and grades your exams. In your case, this is Eduqas, a subsidiary of the WJEC exam board. While it may seem like exam boards are all the same, the small differences between them can make a world of difference for you. With Eduqas the key thing to remember will be that your programming project will not be weighted into your final grade. This means that you just have to get a pass on it and that your written and on-screen exams will be the ones where the marks you get will really make a difference. This tiny detail can make a huge difference in your revision preparation as it helps you prioritise and organise your time in the coming few weeks.

About the Board

Unlike most other examination boards that you may have heard of, Eduqas is actually a subsidiary brand of another exam board. They were created in 2015 by WJEC in order to cater to different education systems between England and Wales (where WJEC is actually from). The WJEC’s aim is for all reformed qualifications that they offer to become Eduqas qualifications – until then they shall still be offered under the WJEC brand. Much like the standards WJEC GCSE, the Eduqas GCSE Computer Science course is assessed as a ‘linear subject’. All this means is that you’ll take all of your exams at the end of your school year rather than throughout it.

How Long Will the Course Take to Complete?

You’ll probably spend either one or two years preparing to take your Eduqas GCSE Computer Science exams. The specification itself does not give a specific timeframe in which the course must be completed. Therefore, the length of study and preparation is left at the discretion of the school or college. The vast majority of schools and colleges will have you start the GCSE at the beginning of Year 10 and finish it by the end of Year 11.

Is Any Prior Knowledge Required?

According to the Eduqas GCSE Computer Science specification, there are no prior knowledge requirements placed on this course. However, the board does specify that the course has been designed to build on the knowledge that students have acquired at Key Stage 3 level, i.e. prior to starting their GCSEs. Therefore, in order for you to make most of the course, it is advised that you complete KS3 first.

What Will I Study?

The Eduqas GCSE Computer Science course has been created to teach you about all of the major topics within the field and to promote the integrated study of computer science. Therefore, you’ll be developing both knowledge and skills throughout the course.
The key topics that you will cover in Component 1: Understanding Computer Science are hardware; logical operations; communication; organisation and structure of data; operating systems; principles of programming; software engineering; program construction; security and data management; and, ethical, legal and environmental impacts of digital technology on society. Meanwhile, in Component 2: Computational Thinking and Programming, you’ll cover problem solving; algorithms and programming constructs; programming languages; data structures and data types; and, security and authentication. Finally in Component 3: Software Development you’ll be trained in software development including design, the refinement log, technical quality, testing and further development.

What is the Examination Process Like?

Unlike the original WJEC course, the Eduqas GCSE in Computer science consists of three assessments with just two of them actually counting towards the final grade. The first assessment in Understanding Computer Science, will last 1 hour and 45 minutes and count for 62.5% of the final grade. While the first assessment will be a written exam, the second will be completed on the computer. Next, the students will sit a 2-hour exam in Computational Thinking and Programming which will count for 37.5% of the final mark. Finally, Software development will be tested through a 20-hour long programming project which will require a pass but not be weighted into the final grade.

Study Tips

Preparing for your Eduqas GCSE Computer Science examinations is a less daunting task than it may seem. It will require some planning and preparation, but then all that’s left is to stick to your plan and you’ll be ready in no time! When planning your revision make sure to take into account the variety of ways that you’ll be assessed in: written, on-screen and through programming. This means that you’ll want to first learn your content inside out. A good way of doing this is by using active learning tools like mind maps and flashcards. Next, you’ll want to practice giving long-form written answers but also doing on-screen tests and quizzes. Lucky for you we’ve compiled all kinds of revision materials which can help you prepare for all three of your exams. Take a look and get started!